Something from Nothing

From MeritBadgeDotOrg

Revision as of 22:42, June 14, 2019 by Nicouds (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ←Older revision | Current revision (diff) | Newer revision→ (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Submit any questions regarding the STEM Nova or Supernova awards to [email protected]


Something from Nothing

This patch is worn as a temporary emblem
on the right uniform pocket.
Created:2019
Last updated:
Level:Venturers and Sea Scouts

The BSA's STEM Nova Awards program is designed to introduce and encourage further study of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) by Cub Scouts, Scouts, Venturers, and Sea Scouts. Youth may earn all STEM Nova awards for their program. The Supernova awards are designed to inspire further study. It is recommended that you complete at least two STEM Nova awards before starting the requirements for the Supernova award.

Youth may complete any STEM Nova award with a parent or unit leader’s guidance. However, Supernova Awards mentors must be approved by the local council. (Note: Lion Cubs and Tiger Cubs are not eligible to participate in the STEM Nova Awards program.)



This module is designed to help explore 3D printing, and how it is becoming prevalent in everyday life. Something from Nothing is part of the Technology category.


Something from Nothing requirements

This module is designed to help explore 3D printing, and how it is becoming prevalent in everyday life.

  1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.
    1. Watch not less than three hours total of shows or documentaries related to 3D printing, additive manufacturing, CAD modeling, and other related fields. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least five questions or ideas from the shows you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor that relate to 3D printing and other additive manufacturing processes.
    2. Read not less than three hours total about anything related to 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and CAD modeling.
      1. Make a list of at least five questions or ideas from the material you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor that relate to 3D printing and other additive manufacturing processes.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching not less than three hours. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least five questions or ideas from the material you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas that relate to 3D printing and other additive manufacturing processes with your counselor.
  2. Choose ONE STEM field of interest from the following list. Complete ALL the requirements for a Venturing STEM exploration in that field. (If you have already completed a Venturing STEM Exploration in one of these fields, please choose a different field for this award.)
    CAD ModelingAdditive ManufacturingSculpting
    Polymers and PlasticsModern ManufacturingInventing
    Wood CarvingWood Working
  3. Choose three activities from the following list and complete all of the requirements.
    1. Design a Model
      1. Design a model of your choosing in a CAD program. Some common CAD programs with free student versions include Autodesk Inventor, Catia, CREO, Google SketchUp, Solid Works and Tinkercad.
      2. With your counselor discuss what you designed and what its purpose was. Discuss what modifications you could make to the design to make it easier to 3D print.
    2. Investigate Model Orientation
      1. Using either the model you made in part A or a different model, load it into the 3D printing software of your choice. Adjust the orientation of the print, and note how the print time changes and how much support material is needed at each orientation.
      2. Discuss with your counselor why the orientation changes the print time required, as well as the amount of support material required. Does the fastest print time require the most support material? What is the best orientation for your specific design? Why does the support material change with different orientations, which gives the most efficient results? Why does print time change with different orientations, which gives the fastest results? Why would you not use the orientation with the fastest print time or lowest material cost?
      3. Print your model.
    3. Investigate Model Settings
      1. Using either the model you made in part A or a different model, load it into the printing software of your choice. Adjust the model wall thickness, infill, and layer thickness, and note any changes in the amount of material used and build time.
      2. Discuss with your Counselor how each setting affects the print times, what causes the least or most amount of print time. Is there a linear relationship between the settings and print time as the values are increased. Similarly, discuss how the model settings affect the amount of material. What combination of settings would you use for different projects? What other settings are there that were not investigated?
      3. Print your model on any setting you wish.
    4. Research different printing materials
      1. What different plastics are commonly used in 3D printers and what are their main differences? What sort of projects would each material be needed for? Which material is most common and how does the pricing vary between the materials?
      2. Investigate different metals used in 3D printing and how the layers are deposited. What companies currently use metal 3D printing and in what sort of products is this process used?
      3. Research other non-metal/non-plastic materials used in 3D printing. What are they used for and how wide spread is their use? (Novelty or Professional)
      4. Share your findings with your counselor.
    5. Research different printing methods
      1. Identify 3 different methods of 3D printing (these do not all have to apply to plastics and desktop printers).
      2. Determine what material is used for each printing method. Compare the methods against each other in terms of time to print, cost of print, pre-work, and post-work. What method is preferred for different printing jobs?
      3. Share your findings with your counselor.
    6. Examine the components of a 3D printer
      1. Identify 4 key parts of a 3D printer.
      2. What do they do and how do they contribute to the function of the printer?
      3. Report your findings to your counselor. Explain which component of a 3D printer you think is the most important.
    7. Investigate different printers and compare them
      1. Research at least 3 different 3D printers. Take note on the different materials that each printer can use, as well as the different layer height, method of printing, and available resources. Some examples include:
        1. Stratasys
        2. Ultimaker
        3. Makerbot
        4. FormLabs
        5. Lulzbot
      2. Discuss with your counselor which printer you would purchase and why.
  4. Choose ONE option and interview a person involved with the field. If possible, visit them in that environment to see what they do. Prepare at least five questions, and share what you learn with your counselor. If you take a virtual tour, with your parent or guardian’s permission you can contact the organization with your questions. If that is not possible, you can discuss them with your counselor. Some possible destinations are listed below.
    1. Professional 3D Printing/Prototyping Lab
    2. University/High School 3D Printing/Prototyping Lab
    3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3D Printing Labs Virtual Tour (online)
    4. Interactive Tour of a "Form Lab" Printer'
  5. Discuss with your counselor how 3D printing affects your everyday life and what you have learned by working on this NOVA.

View the change list (history) of these requirements. The text of these requirements may be locked. In that case, they can only be edited
by an administrator.
Please note any errors found in the above requirements on this article's Talk Page.

Notes

Worksheet A FREE workbook for Something from Nothing is available here! (PDF or Word) with the maps, charts, links, diagrams, and checklists you need! Or click here to print just the Something from Nothing requirements. usscouts.org has PDF and Word versions of workbooks for Scouts BSA ranks and merit badges, Cub Scouting ranks and adventures, and STEM Nova awards.


External links

STEM Nova Awards Program Advancement
Award Overview:STEM Nova awards
Worksheets:Nova & Supernova Award Worksheets
Cub Scout
Nova:Science: Science EverywhereDown and DirtyNova WILD!Out of This WorldUncovering the PastTechnology: Tech TalkCub Scouts Can CodeEngineering: Swing!Up and AwayMath: 1-2-3 Go!Fearful Symmetry
Supernova:Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award (Wolf/Bear only) • Dr. Charles H. Townes Supernova Award (Webelos only)
Scouts BSA
Nova:Science: Shoot!Let It Grow!Splash!Mendel's MinionsTechnology: Start Your Engines!Hello, WorldEngineering: Whoosh!Up and AwayNext Big ThingMath: Designed to Crunch
Supernova:Dr. Bernard Harris Bronze Supernova AwardThomas Edison Silver Supernova Award
Venturer / Sea Scout
Nova:Science: Launch!Wade!What a LifeTechnology: Power UpExecuteSomething from NothingEngineering: Hang On!Up and AwayMath: Numbers Don't Lie
Supernova:Dr. Sally Ride Bronze Supernova AwardWright Brothers Silver Supernova AwardDr. Albert Einstein Gold Supernova Award
Scouter:Dr. Paul A. Siple Bronze Supernova Award

Personal tools
language