Knot

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{{Otheruses|[[Scouter Awards|Adult leader awards]] are also called "knots."}}{{Worksheets available|<table><tr><td>The following PDFs are available:</td><td>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</td><td><li>[[Media:All_lower_rank_knots.pdf|All lower rank knots]] [[Image:Pdficon small.gif]]<li>[[Media:When_to_use_knots_lashings.pdf|When to use knots lashings]] [[Image:Pdficon small.gif]]</td></tr></table>}}
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{{Otheruses|''This page is about '''knot tying'''.<br>For information about ''Square Knot awards'', see [[Scouter Awards]].''}}
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{{Knots Header}}{{TOCright}}
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Here are the '''basic knots''' [[Cub Scout Leader Portal|Cub Scouts]] and [[Boy Scout Portal|Boy Scouts]] learn. These few knots are the only knots you have to know to go all the way to Eagle. Cross-references are provided to the [[Wolf]], [[Bear]], [[Webelos]], [[Tenderfoot]], [[Second Class]], and [[First Class]] requirements.
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[[Image:Nf knots.png|frame|right|Some knots: 1.&nbsp;[[rope splicing|Splice]] 2.&nbsp;[[Manrope knot|Manrope&nbsp;knot]] 3.&nbsp;[[Granny knot|Granny&nbsp;knot]] 4.&nbsp;[[Rosebud stopper knot|Rosebud&nbsp;stopper&nbsp;knot]](?) 5.&nbsp;[[Matthew Walker knot|Matthew&nbsp;Walker&nbsp;knot]] 6.&nbsp;[[Shroud knot|Shroud&nbsp;knot]] 7.&nbsp;[[Turks head knot|Turks&nbsp;head&nbsp;knot]] 8.&nbsp;[[Overhand knot|Overhand&nbsp;knot]], [[Figure-of-eight knot|Figure-of-eight&nbsp;knot]] 9.&nbsp;[[Reef knot|Reef&nbsp;knot]] or [[Square knot|Square&nbsp;knot]] 10.&nbsp;[[Two half hitches|Two&nbsp;half&nbsp;hitches]] (see&nbsp;[[round turn and two half hitches|round&nbsp;turn&nbsp;and&nbsp;two&nbsp;half&nbsp;hitches]])]]
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Many knots below have very good Lesson Videos. Here is a general one for Scout Knots:
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A '''knot''' is a method for fastening or securing linear material such as [[rope]] by tying or interweaving. It may consist of a length of one or more segments of rope, string, [[webbing]], [[twine]], [[strap]] or even chain interwoven so as to create in the line the ability to bind to itself or to some other object - the "load". Knots have been the subject of interest both for their ancient origins, common use, and the mathematical implications of
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* [http://www.expertvillage.com/video/123493_tying-scouting-knots.htm Video: Scouting Knots]
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[[knot theory|knot&nbsp;theory]].
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{{Clear}}
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= Basic Knots =
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==Components==
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{{include|Overhand knot}}
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[[image:BightLoopElbow.jpg|frame|right|Knot components]]
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[[Image:Turn-roundturn-tworoundturns.jpg|right|thumb|A: Turn<br>B: Round turn<br>C: Two round turns]]
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;'''Bight'''
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{{main|Bight (knot)}}
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:The center part of a length of rope, string, or yarn as opposed to the ends.
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:*A '''"bight"''' is any curved section, slack part, or loop between the ends of a rope.
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:*The phrase '''"in the bight"''' implies a U-shaped section of rope is itself being used in making a knot. Many knots can be tied either with the end or ''in the bight''.
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; '''Bitter end'''
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:More a ropeworker's term than a knot term, the reference is to the end of a rope that is tied off, hence the expression "to the bitter end". A ''bitt'' is a metal block with a crosspin used for tying lines to, found on docks.
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;'''Loop''' :A full circle formed by passing the working end over itself. Note that the term 'loop' is also used to refer to a category of knots (see 'Categories' below).
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;'''Elbow''' :Two crossing points created by an extra twist in a loop.
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;'''Standing end'''
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:The end of the rope not involved in making the knot, often shown as unfinished.
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;'''Standing part'''
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:Section of line between knot and the standing end.
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;'''Turn'''
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{{main|Turn (knot)}}
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:*A '''turn''' or '''single turn''' is a single pass behind or through an object.
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:*A '''round turn''' is the complete encirclement of an object; requires two passes.
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:*'''Two round turns''' circles the object twice; requires three passes.
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;'''Working end'''
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:The active end of a line used in making the knot. May also be called the 'running end' or 'live end'.
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;'''Working part'''
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:Section of line between knot and the working end.
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==Categories==
 
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The [[list of knots]] is extensive, but common properties allow for a useful system of categorization. For example, [[loop (knot)|loop]] knots share the attribute of having some kind of an anchor point constructed on the [[standing end]] (such as a loop or overhand knot) into which the working end is easily hitched to using a [[round turn]]. An example of this is the [[bowline]]. Constricting knots often rely on friction to cinch down tight on loose bundles; an example is the [[Miller's knot]]. Knots may belong to more than one category.
 
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;[[Bend knot|Bend]] :A knot uniting two lines (for knots joining two ends of the same line, see [[binding (knot)|binding knots]] or [[loop (knot)|loops]]). [[list of bend knots|List of bends]].
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{{include|Square knot}}
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;[[binding (knot)|Binding]] :A knot that restricts object(s) by making multiple winds. [[List of binding knots]].
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;[[Coil]] :Knots used to tie up lines for storage. [[List of coil knots]].
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;[[Decorative knot]] :A complex knot exhibiting repeating patterns often constructed around and enhancing an object. [[List of decorative knots]].
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;[[Hitch knot|Hitch]] :A knot tied to a post, cable, ring, or spar. [[List of hitch knots]].
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;[[Lashing knot|Lashing]] :A knot used to hold (usually) poles together. [[List of lashing knots]].
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;[[loop (knot)|Loop]] :A knot used to create a closed circle in a line. [[List of loop knots]].
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;[[Plait]] (or Braid):A number of lines interwoven in a simple regular pattern. [[List of plait knots]].
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;[[slip knot|Slip]] (or Running) :A knot tied with a hitch around one of its parts, contrasted. with a loop, which is closed with a bend. A slip knot can be closed, a loop remains the same size. [[List of slip knots]].
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;[[Seizing]] :A knot used to hold two lines or two parts of the same line together. [[List of seizing knots]].
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;[[Sennit]] :A number of lines interwoven in a complex pattern. [[List of sennit knots]].
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;[[Rope splicing|Splice]] :A knot formed by interweaving strands of rope rather than whole lines. More time consuming but usually stronger than simple knots. [[List of splices]].
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;[[stopper (knot)|Stopper]] :A knot tied to hold a line through a hole. [[List of stopper knots]].
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;[[Trick]] :A knot that is used as part of a magic trick, a joke, or a puzzle. [[List of trick knots]].
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;[[whipping knot|Whipping]] :A binding knot used to prevent another line from fraying.
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==Usage==
 
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There is a large variety of knots and each knot has specific properties and suitability for a [[Knot#Categories|range of tasks]]. Some knots are well-adapted to attach to particular objects such as another rope, [[cleat (nautical)|cleat]], ring, or stake. Other knots are made to bind or constrict around an object. Decorative knots usually bind to themselves to produce attractive patterns. Choosing the correct knot for the job at hand is one of the most fundamental aspects of using knots well.
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{{include|Granny knot}}
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===Learning===
 
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The number of books, websites, videos, and other resources available to those interested in learning about knots is a testament to the value they hold for humankind. While some people possess an innate ability to look at a diagram or photo and tie the illustrated knot, for others the initial stages of learning are best accomplished by being shown knot tying methods by a person who already knows them. Knot tying skills are often transmitted by [[sailor]]s, [[Scouting|scout]]s, [[climbing|climber]]s, [[caving|caver]]s, [[arborist]]s, [[Firefighter#Rescue|rescue professional]]s, [[fishermen]], and [[surgeons]]. After mastering a few basic knots, the diagrams and photos become easier to interpret and use to continue the learning process. As more knots are learned, patterns begin to become evident in their structure and methods of tying. The learning of knots rewards practice and patience.
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{{include|Two half-hitches}}
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===Applications===
 
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Knots are essential in many industrial, occupational, recreational, and domestic settings. Even simple activities such as running a load from the hardware store to home can result in disaster if a clumsy twist in a cord passes for a knot. Truckers needing to tie down a load may use a [[trucker's hitch]], gaining [[mechanical advantage]]. Knots can save the [[spelunking|spelunker]] from foolishly becoming buried under millions of tons of rock. Whatever the activity, such as [[sailing]] on the water or [[climbing]] on a cliff-side rock, learning well-tested knots prior to some hazardous activity introduces a critical measure of safety. In addition to safety, appropriate knots can prevent the necessity of cutting lines.
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{{include|Taut-line hitch}}
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Knots can be applied in combination to produce complex objects such as [[lanyard]]s and [[Net (textile)|netting]]. In [[ropework]], the frayed end of a rope is held together by a type of knot called a [[whipping knot]]. Many types of [[textile]]s use knots to repair damage. [[Macrame]], one kind of textile, is generated exclusively through the use of knotting, instead of [[knitting|knits]], crochets, weaves or felting. Macrame can produce self-supporting three dimensional textile structures, as well as flat work, and is often used ornamentally or decoratively.
 
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==Properties==
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{{include|Bowline}}
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===Strength===
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Knots invariably weaken the rope they are made in. When knotted rope is strained to its breaking point, it almost always fails in or near the knot, unless it is defective or damaged elsewhere. The bending, crushing, and chafing forces that hold a knot in place also unevenly stress the rope fibers and ultimately lead to the reduction of strength. The exact mechanisms that cause the weakening and failure are complex and are the subject of continued study.
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The relative knot strength, also called '''knot efficiency''', is the breaking strength of a knotted rope as a proportion of the breaking strength of the rope without the knot. There are many difficulties in determining an overall numeric knot efficiency for a given knot. This is due to the many factors that can affect the results of a knot efficiency test: the type of [[fiber]], the [[Rope#Styles of rope construction|style of rope]], the size of rope, whether it is wet or dry, how the knot is dressed before loading, how rapidly the knot is loaded, whether the knot is repeatedly loaded, and so on. With those limitations noted, most common knots have an efficiency between 40% and 80%.
 
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While some [[Rope splicing|rope splices]] can retain nearly the full strength of the rope when forming loops and bends, conventional knots are much more practical in most situations. Thus the prudent knot user will always allow for a large [[Factor of safety|safety margin]] in the strength of rope chosen for a task due to the weakening effects of knots, aging, damage, shock loading, etc. In general, the '''safe working load''' is often specified as between 10% and 20% of the rated breaking strength of the rope being used.[http://www.boatsafe.com/marlinespike/safeload.htm] For safety of life applications many other factors come into play which are beyond the current scope of this article. Experienced practitioners should always be consulted before using ropes and knots when safety of life, limb, or property is involved.
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{{include|Sheet bend}}
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===Security===
 
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Even if the rope does not break, a knot may still fail to hold. A knot which holds firm under a variety of adverse conditions is said to be more secure than one that does not. The main ways knots fail to hold are:
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{{include|Slip knot}}
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==== Slipping ====
 
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The tension from the load causes the rope to work back through the knot in the direction of the load. If this continues far enough, the working end will pass into the knot and the knot unravels and fails. This behavior can be worsened when the knot is repeatedly strained and let slack, dragged over rough terrain, or repeatedly impacted such as against a [[mast]] or [[flagpole]].
 
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Even with secure knots, some slippage may occur as the knot is first put under real tension. This can be dealt with by leaving plenty of rope at the working end outside of the knot and by dressing the knot cleanly and tightening it as fully as possible before loading. In some cases the use of a [[stopper (knot)|stopper knot]] or, even better, a [[backup knot]] can prevent the working end from passing through the knot, but it is generally better to use a more secure knot if one is observed to slip. In life critical uses backup knots are often added to already secure knots in order to maximize safety.
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{{include|Clove hitch}}
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==== Capsizing ====
 
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Capsizing (or spilling) a knot is changing its form, rearranging its parts, usually by pulling on specific ends in specific ways. Some knots when used in an inappropriate way tend to capsize easily or even spontaneously. Often the capsized form of the knot offers little resistance to slipping or unraveling. For an excellent example of a knot that capsizes dangerously, see the discussion of the [[Reef Knot#Misuse|reef knot used as a bend]].
 
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Sometimes a knot is intentionally capsized as a method of tying another knot, such as the [[Bowline#Tying|"lightning method"]] of tying a Bowline. Some knots, such as the [[Carrick Bend]], are generally tied in one form and then capsized to attain a stronger or more stable form.
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{{include|Timber hitch}}
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==== Sliding ====
 
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In knots that are meant to grip another object, failure can be defined as the knot moving relative to the object being gripped. While the knot itself does not fail, it ceases to perform the desired function. For example a simple [[Rolling hitch|Rolling Hitch]] tied around a railing and pulled parallel to the railing might hold to a certain tension and then start sliding. Sometimes this can be corrected by working-up the knot tighter before subjecting it to load but usually a knot with more wraps, or a different size or type of rope will need to be used.
 
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{{include|Whipping and Fusing rope}}
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== Reference books on knots==
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= See also =
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*[[Clifford Ashley|Clifford W. Ashley]] [[The Ashley Book of Knots|''The Ashley Book of Knots'']]. Doubleday, New York. ISBN 0-385-04025-3
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{{Knots by Use}}
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*R.S. Lee. ''All The Knots You Need''. Algrove Publishing. ISBN 0-921335-47-4
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{{Knot Links}}
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*Raoul Graumont. ''Handbook of Knots''. Cornell Maritime Press/Tidewater Publishers. ISBN 0-87033-030-6
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*Cyrus L. Day. ''Knots & Splices''. International Marine/McGraw-Hill Companies. ISBN 0-87742-252-4
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*Geoffrey Budworth (1999). ''The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Knots & Ropework''. Annes Publishing Limited. ISBN 1-55267-986-1
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*John Cassidy (1985). ''The Klutz Book of Knots''. Klutz Press, [[Palo Alto, California]]. ISBN 0-932592-10-4
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*Des Pawson(2001). ''Pocket Guide to Knots & Splices''. Produced for Propsero Books by RPC Publishing Ltd., London. ISBN 1-55267-218-2
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*Brion Toss. ''The Complete Rigger's Apprentice''. International Marine/McGraw-Hill Companies. ISBN 0-07-064840-9
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*Allen Padgett and Bruce Smith. ''On Rope''. National Speleological Society. ISBN 0-9615093-2-5
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*J.C. Turner and P. van de Griend (ed.) (1996). ''History and Science of Knots''. World Scientific. ISBN 981-02-2469-9
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==External links==
 
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*[[Media:All_lower_rank_knots.pdf|All lower rank knots]] [[Image:Pdficon small.gif]] (2MB PDF)
 
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*[[Media:When_to_use_knots_lashings.pdf|When to use knots lashings]] [[Image:Pdficon small.gif]] (152K PDF)
 
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*[http://www.seascout.org/general_resources/download_area.html#img12 Sea Scout Knots]
 
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*[http://www.realknots.com/knots/index.htm Ropers Knots Page] Practical knots
 
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*[http://www.tollesburysc.co.uk/Knots/Knots_gallery.htm Knot Gallery] (GIF format)
 
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*[http://www.spadout.com/wiki/index.php/Knot Rock Climbing Knots]
 
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*[http://www.animatedknots.com Animated knots] (Javascript)
 
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*[http://www.layhands.com/Knots/Knots_KnotsIndex.htm Knots Index]
 
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<!-- *[http://www.neropes.com/splice/knots.htm Common knots] Broken 4/10/07 -->
 
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*[http://www.fishing-nc.com/fishing-knots.php Fishing knots]
 
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*[http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/index.htm Ian's Shoelace Site]
 
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*[http://www.igkt.net International Guild of Knot Tyers]
 
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*[http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/knotting/notate.htm Notation describing methods of tying knots]
 
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*[http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/knotindex.html The Notable Knot Index]
 
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*[http://www.draftlight.net/lifeonaline/ Underground rope rescue knots]
 
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{{Printer-friendly|<table><tr><td>There are some great PDFs you can print:</td><td>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</td><td>
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<li>[[Media:Step-By-Step-Knots-11-Basic-Scout-Knots.pdf|Step-By-Step Knots]]: 11 Basic Knots fit on the front and back of one page. {{PDF}}
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<li>[[Media:Six-Boy-Scout-Knots.pdf|Six Boy Scout Knots]] by John Geffre {{PDF}}
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<li>[[Media:All_lower_rank_knots.pdf|All lower rank knots]] {{PDF}}
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<li>[[Media:When_to_use_knots_lashings.pdf|When to use knots lashings]] {{PDF}}
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</td></tr></table>|auto}}
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= External links =
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* [http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/standardknot.htm Ian's Shoelace Site]
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* [http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/knotindex.html The Notable knot Index]
[[Category:Knots]]
[[Category:Knots]]
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[[Category:Scoutcraft]]
 

Revision as of 23:54, October 18, 2016

This page is about knot tying.
For information about
Square Knot awards, see Scouter Awards.
Animated Knots show you how to tie Basic Knots, Fishing Knots, Sailing Knots, Climbing Knots, Forty Knots,
Special Knots, and Advanced Knots, for Wolf, Bear, Webelos, Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class.

Contents

Here are the basic knots Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts learn. These few knots are the only knots you have to know to go all the way to Eagle. Cross-references are provided to the Wolf, Bear, Webelos, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class requirements.

Many knots below have very good Lesson Videos. Here is a general one for Scout Knots:

Basic Knots

Overhand knot

Main article: Overhand knot
Overhand knot
Image:Overhand_knot.gif
Names Overhand knot, Thumb knot
Typical use Extreme jamming
Caveat Spills if the standing part is pulled forcibly in the wrong direction.
Releasing Extreme jamming
Category Stopper knots
Group Basic knots
Related Overhand loop, Figure-eight knot, Angler's loop, Fisherman's knot, Water knot
Animation of tying a Overhand knot
Animation of tying a Overhand knot
The Overhand knot is used in other knots including the Square knot which is two Overhand knots. The overhand knot can be used temporarily but can untie very easily if tied around something. The overhand knot can be used as a stopper knot and can keep a rope from fraying or unraveling but the Figure Eight is a much better stopper knot.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Make a loop and go through it.


Lesson Videos


Notes



Square knot

Main article: Square knot
Square knot
Image:Square_knot.gif
Names Square knot, Reef knot
Typical use Joining two ends of a single line to bind around an object.
Caveat Not secure as a bend. Spills easily if one of the free ends is pulled outward. Does not hold well if the two lines are not the same thickness.
Releasing Jamming
Category Binding knots
Group Basic knots
Related Thief knot, Granny knot, Grief knot, Surgeon's knot
Animation of tying a Square knot
Animation of tying a Square knot
The square knot is also known as the joining knot because it can join two ropes together and because it is the first knot Scouts learn when they join the BSA. It has many uses-from securing bundles, packages, and the sails of ships to tying the ends of bandages.
Boy Scout Handbook p. 8


There have probably been more lives lost as a result of using a square knot as a bend (to tie two ropes together) than from the failure of any other half dozen knots combined." The Sheet Bend is as easy to tie and untie.
See The Ashley Book of Knots # 1402, p 258.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Hold one rope end in each hand.
  2. Pass the right end over and under the rope in your left hand and pull it snug.
  3. Pass the rope now in your left hand over and under the one now in your right, and pull it snug.


Lesson Videos


Notes
  • Remember: "Right over left, left over right, makes a knot tidy, and tight."
  • The Square knot comes untied easily and is not as strong as a Sheet bend.
  • The Overhand knot is one of the Forty Knots.



Granny knot

Main article: Granny knot
Granny knot
Image:Granny knot.gif
Names Granny knot,
Typical use To show what not to do.
Caveat Should not be used as a bend. Inferior to reef knot for binding purposes, it can release suddenly and unpredictably.
Releasing Often jams
Category Binding knots
Group Basic knots
Related Square knot, Thief knot, Grief knot
Animation of tying a Granny knot
Animation of tying a Granny knot
When your shoes keep coming untied, it is because you are tying Granny knots instead of Square knots. The Granny knot is given to show what not to do. The Granny knot will come untied almost immediately and is not used for any Boy Scout application.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Right over left, right over left, makes a knot ugly and WRONG.


Lesson Videos


Notes
  • Remember: "Right over left, left over right, makes a knot tidy, and tight."
  • The Square knot comes untied easily and is not as strong as a Sheet bend.
  • The Granny knot is one of the Forty Knots.



Two half-hitches

Main article: Two half-hitches
Two half-hitches
Image:Two_half_hitches.gif
Names Two half-hitches, Clove hitch over itself
Typical use General-purpose hitch
Caveat
Releasing Non-jamming
Category Hitch knots
Group Basic knots
Related
Animation of tying a Two half-hitches
Animation of tying a Two half-hitches
Use two half-hitches to tie a rope around a post. Pass the end of the rope around the post. Bring the end over and under the body of the rope (known as the standing part), then back through the loop thus formed. That makes a half hitch. Take the end around the standing part a second time and tie another half hitch. Pull it snug.
Boy Scout Handbook p. 36


Required for


Instructions
  1. Loop over the top and pull through the hole to make a Half hitch.
  2. Make a second Half hitch on the outside.
  3. Pull tight.


Lesson Videos


Notes
  • The Two half-hitches knot is only secure when it is tight against the post.
  • Two half-hitches is one of the Forty Knots.



Taut-line hitch

Main article: Taut-line hitch
Taut-line hitch
Image:Tautline_hitch.gif
Names Taut-line hitch, Adjustable hitch, Rigger's Hitch, Midshipman's Hitch, Tent-line hitch, Tent hitch
Typical use
Caveat
Releasing
Category Hitch knots
Group Basic knots
Related Two half-hitches, Rolling hitch, Trucker's hitch
Animation of tying a Taut-line hitch
Animation of tying a Taut-line hitch
The taut-line hitch is tied to a line that is tight, or taut. Use it to tighten or loosen a tent guyline by pushing the hitch up or down. Here's how:

Pass the line around the tent stake. Bring the end under and over the standing part and twice through the loop you have formed. Again bring the pore end under, over, and through the loop, but this time farther up the standing part. Work any slack out of the knot, then slide the hitch to adjust the tension on the line.

Boy Scout Handbook p. 37
The Taut Line Hitch or Rolling Hitch attaches a rope (usually smaller) to another (usually larger) when the line of pull is almost parallel. It can also be used to attach a rope to a pole.
Grog
See The Ashley Book of Knots # 1735, p. 298.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Loop over the top and pull through the hole to make a Half hitch.
  2. Loop over the top and through the hole again.
  3. One last Half hitch on the outside.
  4. Pull tight.


Lesson Videos


Notes



Bowline

Main article: Bowline
Bowline
Image:Bowline-small.gif
Names Bowline, Boling knot (archaic)
Typical use Making a fixed loop in the end of a line.
Caveat Although widely considered a reliable knot, it may not hold when tied in certain materials or loading conditions.
Releasing Non-jamming
Category Loop knots
Group Basic knots
Related Sheet bend, Double bowline, Bowline on a bight, Water bowline, Yosemite bowline, Spanish bowline, Portuguese bowline, Triple bowline, Running bowline
Animation of tying a Bowline
Animation of tying a Bowline
Bowline knot – rescue knot, most useful of knots because it forms a loop that will not slip and is easy to untie. Use it to attach a cord to a pack frame, tie a rope through a grommet of a tent, secure a line to a canoe, and in rescue situations, and in a thousand other ways. Learn to tie the bowline around a post and in the free end of a rope. With practice, you can even tie it with one hand.

Make a small overhand loop in the standing part of a rope. Bring the rope end up through the loop, around behind the standing part, and back down into the loop. Tighten the bowline by pulling the standing part away from the loop.

Boy Scout Handbook pp. 148-149


The Bowline makes a reasonably secure loop in the end of a piece of rope. It has many uses, e.g., to fasten a mooring line to a ring or a post. Under load, it does not slip or bind. With no load it can be untied easily. It's principle shortcoming is that it cannot be tied, or untied, when there is a load on the standing end. It should therefore be avoided when, for example, a mooring line may have to be released under load. Two bowlines can be linked together to join two ropes.
Grog
See The Ashley Book of Knots # 1010, p 186.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Make a loop (top to you).
  2. The rabbit goes out of the hole, around the tree, and back into the hole.


Lesson Videos


Notes


One-Handed Bowline
The One Handed Bowline is a useful and quick way to tie a bowline when the other hand is occupied or injured. There are three main steps.
1. Hold the short end and tie a half hitch with your whole forearm.
2. Pass the short end round the standing end.
3. Still holding the short end, withdraw your hand from the loop.
Grog


Sheet bend

Main article: Sheet bend
Sheet bend
Image:Sheet_bend.gif
Names Sheet bend, Becket bend, Weaver's knot, Weaver's hitch
Typical use Joining two ropes of different diameters.
Caveat
Releasing
Category Bend knots
Group Basic knots
Related Bowline
Animation of tying a Sheet bend
Animation of tying a Sheet bend

The Sheet bend is much more secure than a Square knot.

[The Sheet bend] serves almost every purpose well, and unties readily without damaging the rope.
See The Ashley Book of Knots # 1431, p. 262.


The Sheet Bend is recommended for joining two ropes of unequal size... It works equally well if the ropes are of the same size.
Grog


Required for


Instructions
  1. Make a loop in one end.
  2. The rabbit goes out of the hole, around the tree and back under his path.


Lesson Videos


Notes



Slip knot

Main article: Slip knot
Slip knot
Image:Running_knot.gif
Names Slip knot, Running Hitch
Typical use Sailing
Caveat
Releasing
Category Hitch knots
Group Basic knots
Related
Animation of tying a Slip knot
Animation of tying a Slip knot


Required for


Instructions
  1. Make a loop.
  2. Pull a loop up through the loop.
  3. Pull tight.


Lesson Videos


Notes



Clove hitch

Main article: Clove hitch
Clove hitch
Image:Clove_hitch.gif
Names Clove hitch,
Typical use Securing lines running along a series of posts, belaying, starting lashings, weak binding
Caveat Can spill if the standing part is pulled forcibly in the wrong direction.
Releasing Jamming
Category Hitch knots
Group Basic knots
Related Slippery hitch, Two half-hitches, Buntline hitch, Constrictor knot, Ground-line hitch, Lashings, Snuggle hitch
Animation of tying a Clove hitch
Animation of tying a Clove hitch
Clove Hitch(Method 2)
Clove Hitch
(Method 2)
Since clove comes from the word cleave meaning “to split”, a clove hitch is split into two parts like the foot of a deer or a sheep – used to end lashings… form the first half hitch of the clove hitch by taking a bight (loop) around the pole and then across itself.

Form the second half hitch of the clove hitch by taking the second bight around the pole and tucking the end of the rope under the rope between the two loops. When pulled tight, the clove hitch should look like an X. The difference between a clove hitch and two half-hitches is that a clove hitch is tied around an object and two half-hitches are tied around the rope’s own standing part.

An alternative way of tying a clove hitch it to make and overhand loop in the rope. Then make a second overhand loop next to the first loop. Next, without turning over either loop, place the first loop on top of the second loop. Finally, place the two loops over the end of a pole or around the neck of the bear bag and pull tight.

Boy Scout Handbook p. 139, 11th ed.


The Clove hitch was, originally, included here with the intention of condemning it. It does have two major failings: it slips and, paradoxically, can also bind.}
Grog
See The Ashley Book of Knots # 1245, p. 224.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Loop over the top.
  2. Loop around again below.
  3. Pull through the hole.


Lesson Videos


Notes





Timber hitch

Main article: Timber hitch
Timber hitch
Image:Timber_hitch.gif
Names Timber hitch, Lumberman's Knot, Countryman's Knot
Typical use To attach a rope to a piece of wood.
Caveat
Releasing
Category Hitch knots
Group Basic knots
Related
Animation of tying a Timber hitch
Animation of tying a Timber hitch
The timber hitch is the knot to use for dragging a log across the ground. It is also the knot that starts a diagonal lashing.
Boy Scout Handbook p. 138


The Timber Hitch is described by as much used for handling cargo "... for which it is very convenient, as it practically falls apart when pull ceases." It is also useful when towing a spar or log either afloat or on land. When used for this purpose, the Timber Hitch is often placed near the center of the spar and a separate half-hitch is dropped over the end of the spar to act as a guide.
Grog


See The Ashley Book of Knots #1665, p. 290.


Required for


Instructions
  1. Pass the end of the rope around the log.
  2. Loop the end around the starting part of the rope, then wrap the end around itself three or more times.
  3. Tighten the hitch against the log.


Lesson Videos


Notes



Whipping and Fusing rope

Whipping
Whipping

Whipping:
If the cut end is left un-whipped, the rope will fray or untwist, and loose strength. Whip the ends of ropes to prevent fraying and prolongs the life of the rope.

Instructions

Lay twine (or dental floss) on rope to form a loop. Wrap the twine around with neat, tight bindings until the length of whipping is two to three times the diameter of the rope. Pull the working end of twine through the loop. Pull hard on the other end of the twine to draw tight under the wraps. Cut off loose ends and roll the whipping under foot.

Fusing:
Tape the nylon, polyester, polypropylene rope around the area to be cut. Cut in middle of the tape leaving tape intact on each side. When cutting these fibers with a pocket knife or scissors, the cut ends should be fused with a match or candle flame to prevent untwisting. Natural fiber ropes do not fuse.

Required for:

Lesson Videos
Fusing
Fusing


See also

Knots by Use
Basic knots Overhand knot · Square knot · Granny knot · Two half-hitches · Taut-line hitch · Bowline · Sheet bend · Slip knot · Clove hitch · Timber hitch
Advanced knots Constrictor knot · Monkey's fist · Ocean plait · Trucker's hitch · Turk's head
Special knots Braiding · Carrick bend · Chain sinnet · Cow hitch · Double sheet bend · Sheep shank
Fishing knots Arbor backing knot · Barrel knot · Blood knot · Blood loop · Clinch knot · Fisherman's knot · Improved clinch knot · Nail knot · Needle knot · Palomar knot · Surgeon's loop · Turle knot
Sailing knots Bowline on a Bight · Cleat Hitch · Double Bowline · Figure Eight · Marline Hitch · Midshipman's Hitch · Rolling Hitch · Stevedores Knot
Climbing knots Alpine Butterfly knot · Double fisherman's knot (Grapevine) · Figure eight follow-through · Figure eight on a bight · Figure eight on bend · Figure eight knot · Prusik knot · Safety knot · Water knot
Forty knots


There are some great PDFs you can print:   
  • Step-By-Step Knots: 11 Basic Knots fit on the front and back of one page. Adobe Acrobat PDF
  • Six Boy Scout Knots by John Geffre Adobe Acrobat PDF
  • All lower rank knots Adobe Acrobat PDF
  • When to use knots lashings Adobe Acrobat PDF

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