Fingerprinting

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{{Merit Badge Requirement resources}}
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*1, 2, & 3. [http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cjisd/fproll.html FBI Fingerprint Identification, History, etc.]
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*1, 2, & 3. [http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/fingerprints_biometrics/fingerprint-overview FBI Fingerprint Identification, History, etc.]
: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingerprint Wikipedia Fingerprint Resources]
: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingerprint Wikipedia Fingerprint Resources]
*1. [http://www.usmarshals.gov/usmsforkids/fingerprint_history.htm Fingerprint History]
*1. [http://www.usmarshals.gov/usmsforkids/fingerprint_history.htm Fingerprint History]

Revision as of 23:48, July 1, 2011

Resources include the Fingerprinting merit badge worksheet Adobe Acrobat PDF, links, and cross-references to related badges and awards.  Prev  -  Next  

Fingerprinting merit badge
Status: Elective
Created: 1938
Discontinued: no
BSA Advancement ID: 049
Requirements revision: 2004
Latest pamphlet revision: 2003

Contents

In earning the Fingerprinting merit badge, Scouts will learn about and use an important technique that is used by law enforcement officers, along with other materials like matching dental records and DNA sampling, to help identify amnesia victims, missing persons, abducted children, and others.



Fingerprinting requirements

  1. Give a short history of fingerprinting. Tell the difference between civil and criminal identification.
  2. Explain the difference between the automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS) now used by some law enforcement agencies and the biometric fingerprint systems used to control access to places like buildings, airports, and computer rooms.
  3. Do the following:
    a. Name the surfaces of the body where friction or papillary ridges are found.
    b. Name the two basic principles supporting the science of fingerprints and give a brief explanation of each principle.
    c. Explain what it takes to positively identify a person using fingerprints.
  4. Take a clear set of prints using ONE of the following methods:
    a. Make both rolled and plain impressions. Make these on an 8-by-8-inch fingerprint identification card available from your local police department or counselor.
    b. Using clear adhesive tape, a pencil, and plain paper, record your own fingerprints or those of another person.
  5. Show your merit badge counselor you can identify the three basic types of fingerprint patterns and their subcategories. Using your own hand, identify the types of patterns you see.


The official source for the information shown in this article or section is:
Boy Scout Requirements, 2014 Edition (BSA Supply No. 33216 - SKU# 619576)

The text of these requirements is locked and can only be edited
by an administrator.
Please note any errors found in the above requirements on this article's Talk Page.


Notes

Worksheet A FREE workbook for Fingerprinting is available here! Adobe Acrobat PDF
with the maps, charts, links, diagrams, and checklists you need!
Or click here to print just the Fingerprinting requirements.
meritbadge.org has PDF and DOC versions of
Boy Scout merit badge workbooks,
Webelos workbooks, and Cub Scout workbooks.
  1. Per the BSA: "You should read the merit badge pamphlet on the subject." Pamphlets (books) are at local Scout Shops and online at ScoutStuff.org.
  2. "Get a signed Merit Badge application from your Scoutmaster." An online, printable Word doc file version is available.


Requirement resources

Wikipedia Fingerprint Resources
FBI Fingerprinting Video Lesson ·


Related awards

See also

Boy Scout portal
Varsity Scout portal
Venturing portal

General Merit Badge information


External links



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