Citizenship (merit badge)

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Citizenship merit badge
Image:Citizenship.JPG
Status: Discontinued BSA Advancement ID: unavailable
Created: 1947 Original/new/replaced:
Discontinued: 1951 Replaced by:

Contents

[[Category:Discontinued {{{group}}} merit badges]]

Citizenship is a discontinued merit badge. Replaced Civics merit badge in 1947 and then in 1951 was replaced by Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the Nation and Citizenship in the World and Citizenship in the Home and World Brotherhood.

Merit badge requirements

1. Be familiar with the Declaration of Independance, the Constitution of the United States, and have a working knowledge of the structure of his federsal, state and local Government.
2. Do the following:
(a) Tell which department of his local government has jurisdiction in each of the following instances: automobile accident, mad dog scare, permit to hold a political meeting in a public building, building permit, dog license, contagious disease, garbage disposal.
(b) Learn by visiting one of these departments and talking with some of those responsible for its management, how it operates. Tell where the money comes from to run the department and what it costs the average family in the community per year.
3. Present a simple scrapbook of clippings from newspapers or other current literature, setting forth some local, county, state ot national civic problem, if possible showing both sides of the question. Explain how he thinks it can best be solved, or list the priciple arguments on both sides, OR list the various departments in his local government such as fire, police, health, department of education, etc. with the amount of tax money spend during the last year for the work of each. List the departments in the order of amounts spent.
4. List at least two important civic regulations, which apply to him or his family, with regards to each of the following: highway safety, property rights, fire hazards, sanitation, and special permits such as hunting and fishing.
5. Attend a political meeting, metting of the city or town council, a session of court, or other public civic meeting, and make a full report of his observations.
6. Take active part in at least one co-operative civic enterprise, such as: Checking a local precinct for complete list of voting registration or for accuracy of registration; get-out-the-vote campaign; clean-up week; anti-noise campaign; improving the appearance or usefulness of a vacant lot; collecting magazines and books regularly and taking them to a hospital, old people's home or similar institution; cleaning up some spot of historical interest; controlling of insect pests.
7. Select someone who has figured prominently in the histroy of his community or in the history of our country and from incidents in his life show why he deserves the title "a good citizen".
8. Describe four types of national government.


Boy Scout Requirements, ({{{1}}}) Edition The official source for the information shown in this article or section is:
Handbook for Boys, 1948 Edition

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