Akela

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In Cub Scout packs, Akela (pronounced Ah-KAY-la) means "Good Leader". Akela is a symbol of wisdom, authority, and leadership. Akela is anyone who acts as a leader to the Scout. Akela can be a Cubmaster, Den Leader, parent or teacher depending on where the guidance takes place. In den meetings, it is the Den Leader who is Akela. During pack meetings it is the Cubmaster. At home, the parents fill this role.

Baden-Powell chose Kipling's Jungle Book as a source of symbolism and allegorical framework for the youngest members of the Scouting movement. Many references are made to this story in the Cub Scout section, including the "Council Rock" for discussions and planning, and the "Grand Howl" to express a sense of belonging and team spirit.

Cub scout packs use an oath called the "Law of the Pack" to show allegiance and demonstrate their relationship to Akela and the pack:

The Cub Scout follows Akela
The Cub Scout helps the pack go
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow
The Cub Scout gives goodwill
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